Line.png
 

Translated from the Albanian by Robert Elsie,
Janice Mathie-Heck, and Alexandra Channer
 

The Demolition of the Eiffel Tower is not only a symbolic title but a cry of alarm. It is a text of great strength – devastating in its impact.
Andrea Porcheddu, gli statigenerali, Italy

The Eiffel Tower is collapsing before our eyes. It is being demolished by the red, blue, green, and black sultans who are appearing everywhere.
Albatros Rexhaj, Gazetta Tribuna, Prishtina

A perfect dramaturgical machine that spares no one in the act of dismantling, piece by piece, not only stereotypes, misunderstandings, and prejudices with respect to Islam, but the myth of a tolerant Europe as well.
Anna Maria Monteverdi, Hystrio, Italy

His writing attempts to build bridges in a world traumatized by conflict and to bring nuanced communication to a world under the deadly grip of Manichaeism. — American Theatre, United States

Quantity:
Add to Book Bag
 
page-break.png
 

Translated from the Albanian by Ani Gjika

Through the course of a night, and across illimitable space, a man from Kosovo is plagued by a mosquito.

A traumatized ghost . . .  a soul betrayed . . .  a man under the spell of madness . . .  The actor thrills to the roots of the hair . . .     
Eliona Lata, Gazeta Shekulli, Kosovo

Political poetry in the broadest sense . . . observed from various angles, but always with a lucid bite. Very.  
Héctor Carreto, Periódio de Poesía, Mexico City

Winner of the Katarina Josipi Award for best original drama of 2010, presented by the National Theater of Kosovo.

Winner of the first prize at the Festival of Monodrama, Vlorë, Albania in 2013.

Quantity:
Add to Book Bag
 
 

Translated from the Greek by Alexi Kaye Campbell

If you had to leave home in a hurry – in the face of a cataclysm – what would you take with you?

This is theatre that makes you feel that you’ve got your feet wet, whether clambering up the beach or reaching out a hand from the rocks. — Howard Loxton, British Theatre Guide

His goal is to show us around the chaotic, hostile, unwelcoming, wounded, helpless “land of men.” Flourakis engages himself . . . with the savage and sacred material of human nature.
Eleni Koutsileou, Avgi, Greece

A verbal mosaic of ideas, desires, judgements, doubts and rationales . . . The text indisputably showcases one and only one protagonist: the crowd. — Eleni Triantafylopoulou, from the introduction to I Want a Country

Commissioned by the Royal Court Theatre.  Inspired by the refugee crisis.

Quantity:
Add to Book Bag
 
Line.png
 

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Following a sudden order by the Ministry of Sport, the National Theater of Kosovo is tasked with preparing a “national” play for the celebration of their long-awaited independence.

The nation as a cuckoo’s nest? Its theatre as an asylum? . . . A farce that magnifies the relation between art and politics.
Thomas Hahn, Theater heute, Germany

The play dances along to broken, out-of-tune music, symbolizing the artificial quality of art that is conquered and oppressed by “higher” interests. — Nemanja Cabrić, BIRN, Belgrade

Dialectical and para-national . . . the play demystifies the effects of politics on art. — Ana Tasić, Politika, Serbia

A healthy and cheerful POLITICAL COMEDY . . . Neziraj laughs out loud in the face of bribery, brutality, dullness, lack of knowledge, ignorance . . .
Goran Cvetković, Radio Belgrade 2

Quantity:
Add to Book Bag
 
Line.png
 

Translated from the Albanian by Doruntina Basha and Janice Mathie-Heck

Long after the war in Kosovo, two women – left with a gaping disappearance – observe an anniversary.

The poetry of the language conveys the infinite nuances of the relationship. — ATSH: Albanian News Agency

The first play from a Kosovo playwright ever to appear in Belgrade theaters. — Dardan Zhegrova, Kosovo 2.0

Disappeared sons: monstrous creatures on an imperceptible border between being and nothingness. — Zlatko Paković, from the  Introduction to the Serbian version of One Flew over the Kosovo Theater, An Anthology of Contemporary Drama from Kosovo

How deeply incised, the claw marks of unseen crimes.
Nenad Obradović, e- novine.com

Winner of the Golden Laurel for Best Balkan Contemporary Play at the MESS International Theater Festival, Sarajevo 2013

Quantity:
Add to Book Bag
 
 

Translated from the Albanian by Fadil Bajraj

An imaginary beauty parlor — within an insane asylum — is the scene of mesmerizing confessions . . .

The war is now over and the psychiatric hospital has been transformed (at least in the minds of four of its inmates) into a beauty salon. — Gilles Boulan, Le Billet des Auteurs de Théâtre, Paris

Words of love dominate those of war, though traces of the latter can still be detected underneath . . . The skillful intertwining of tragic and grotesque elements . . . hold the historical and psychological aspects together. — David Larre, Au Poulailler, Paris

Conversations about nails and haircuts occur, and . . . “beauties of the night” are “produced,” which are unmasked in the morning. — Borka Pavićevič, from the preface to the French publication of War in Times of Love

He has managed to create, or is on the way to creating, a Neziresque universe. — Ballsor Hoxha, Koha Ditore, Kosovo

Quantity:
Add to Book Bag
 
Line.png
 

Translated from the Greek by Eleni Drivas

In a chorus of distinct voices, with every human impulse in play, they conjure up a country.

The attitude of the citizen toward the constant flow of extreme events. — Antigone Katsadima, Agrinioculture, Greece

An expressionistic smattering of ideas . . . an abstract take on mass migration. — Rachel Abrams, The Easy, United States

Its lament for a homeland gone awry, for the security of the past to return . . . is a delicately persuasive one. ― There Ought to Be Clowns, UK

Written in . . . an unconventional, chorus-like structure . . . with no concrete characters, scenes, or dialogues, the writing ingeniously conveys a sense of volatility and bewilderment. —Text for the PRAXIS theatre group production, Oxford, UK

Quantity:
Add to Book Bag
 
 

FORTHCOMING

Translated from the Albanian by Fadil Bajraj

Translated from the Albanian by Fadil Bajraj

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Montenegrin by Paula Gordon

Translated from the Montenegrin by Paula Gordon

Translated from the Bosnian by Ellen Elias-Bursać

Translated from the Bosnian by Ellen Elias-Bursać

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Turkish by  Özlem Karadağ

Translated from the Turkish by Özlem Karadağ

Translated from the Turkish by  Özlem Karadağ

Translated from the Turkish by Özlem Karadağ

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Blendi Kraja

Translated from the Albanian by Blendi Kraja

Translated from the Albanian by Ajkuna Hoppe

Translated from the Albanian by Ajkuna Hoppe

Translated from the Greek by Emmanuela Lia

Translated from the Greek by Emmanuela Lia

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Elizabeth Gowing

Translated from the Albanian by Elizabeth Gowing

Translated from the Turkish by Ebru Nihan Celkan

Translated from the Turkish by Ebru Nihan Celkan

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

Translated from the Albanian by Alexandra Channer

 
 
page-break.png
 

PLAYS FOR YOUNGER AUDIENCES

Translated from the Albanian by Fadil Bajraj

Translated from the Albanian by Fadil Bajraj

Tranlsated from the Albanian by Fadil Bajraj

Tranlsated from the Albanian by Fadil Bajraj